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The information on this site is from academic and research studies. Applicability to humans must be determined by a licensed medical professional.

Partial list of Citations used for Recommendations or Conditions

Recent additions may not be included. There is an intentional delay in making those available.

  1. Gut Microbiome Composition in Non-human Primates Consuming a Western or Mediterranean Diet.
    Frontiers in nutrition (Front Nutr ) Vol: 5 Issue Pages: 28
    Pub: 2018 Epub: 2018 Apr 25
    • Nagpal R
    • Shively CA
    • Appt SA
    • Register TC
    • Michalson KT
    • Vitolins MZ
    • Yadav H

  2. Shifts on Gut Microbiota Associated to Mediterranean Diet Adherence and Specific Dietary Intakes on General Adult Population.
    Frontiers in microbiology (Front Microbiol ) Vol: 9 Issue Pages: 890
    Pub: 2018 Epub: 2018 May 7
    • Garcia-Mantrana I
    • Selma-Royo M
    • Alcantara C
    • Collado MC

  3. Long-term intake of a high prebiotic fiber diet but not high protein reduces metabolic risk after a high fat challenge and uniquely alters gut microbiota and hepatic gene expression.
    Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) (Nutr Res ) Vol: 34 Issue 9 Pages: 789-96
    Pub: 2014 Sep Epub: 2014 Aug 23
    • Saha DC
    • Reimer RA

  4. High-level dietary fibre up-regulates colonic fermentation and relative abundance of saccharolytic bacteria within the human faecal microbiota in vitro.
    European journal of nutrition (Eur J Nutr ) Vol: 51 Issue 6 Pages: 693-705
    Pub: 2012 Sep Epub: 2011 Sep 28
    • Shen Q
    • Zhao L
    • Tuohy KM

  5. The effect of sucrose or starch-based diet on short-chain fatty acids and faecal microflora in rats.
    Journal of applied microbiology (J Appl Microbiol ) Vol: 86 Issue 2 Pages: 245-50
    Pub: 1999 Feb Epub:
    • Cresci A
    • Orpianesi C
    • Silvi S
    • Mastrandrea V
    • Dolara P

  6. Influence of a diet enriched with virgin olive oil or butter on mouse gut microbiota and its correlation to physiological and biochemical parameters related to metabolic syndrome.
    PloS one (PLoS One ) Vol: 13 Issue 1 Pages: e0190368
    Pub: 2018 Epub: 2018 Jan 2
    • Prieto I
    • Hidalgo M
    • Segarra AB
    • Martínez-Rodríguez AM
    • Cobo A
    • Ramírez M
    • Abriouel H
    • Gálvez A
    • Martínez-Cañamero M

  7. Consumption of a high-fat diet alters the seminal fluid and gut microbiomes in male mice.
    Reproduction, fertility, and development (Reprod Fertil Dev ) Vol: 29 Issue 8 Pages: 1602-1612
    Pub: 2017 Aug Epub:
    • Javurek AB
    • Spollen WG
    • Johnson SA
    • Bivens NJ
    • Bromert KH
    • Givan SA
    • Rosenfeld CS

  8. Temporal microbiota changes of high-protein diet intake in a rat model.
    Anaerobe (Anaerobe ) Vol: 47 Issue Pages: 218-225
    Pub: 2017 Oct Epub: 2017 Jun 17
    • Mu C
    • Yang Y
    • Luo Z
    • Zhu W

  9. The type and quantity of dietary fat and carbohydrate alter faecal microbiome and short-chain fatty acid excretion in a metabolic syndrome `at-risk` population.
    International journal of obesity (2005) (Int J Obes (Lond) ) Vol: 37 Issue 2 Pages: 216-23
    Pub: 2013 Feb Epub: 2012 Mar 13
    • Fava F
    • Gitau R
    • Griffin BA
    • Gibson GR
    • Tuohy KM
    • Lovegrove JA

  10. Curated database of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microbiota
    Generative Bioinformatics (Center of Excellence in Generative Medicine ) Vol: Issue Pages:
    Pub: 2014 Jun Epub:
    • D'Adamo Peter

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